Art Event #6

11 Nov

1. “In the Land of the Deaf”, November 9th, 2011, seen in Arts 111. A French documentary about hearing-impaired individuals fitting in with society and communicating through sign language.

2. I watched it on a big screen in Arts 111 with Prof. Diekman’s sound studio class. I can best remember the documentary for its originality and silent moments.

3. Near the beginning of the film, I watched little children practice their speech with interesting computer programs. Some included inflating a balloon and moving a train down the track. Perhaps I could come up with interesting ways to help children train their tongues.

4. I learned about the struggles the deaf people experienced. For example, one of them wanted to be an actor, but he wasn’t allowed because of his loss of hearing. He even admitted he would mouth the lines given to him. I also felt pity for the people who were the only ones in their families to have no hearing. Some families consisted of at least one person who knew sign language while the rest were practically having a hard time understanding it.

5. There were no notable flaws in the documentary, and the sign language interviewees were able to get their messages across just fine. However, I might want to point out that the footage with the French boy fooling around with the microphone and camera seemed a little unnecessary, but watching it was priceless.

6. When teaching children to say a certain sound, like “sss”, it can quite a lot of time before they get it right. All you need is a lot of patience and encouragement. I also learned that sign language isn’t exactly the same in different countries around the world. Why, the sign language from France, which I’d been watching, is much different from American English sign language. Not to mention the Italian and Japanese varieties.

7. The director aimed the film at all ages, and that’s one thing I respect about that person. You can still communicate with your audience about problems just as long as you do it the right way.

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